General

  • What is the shelf life of your epoxy resin products?

    Performance of our epoxy products is guaranteed for three years from the date of manufacture, printed on the bottom of the containers, provided they are stored properly. They will probably last much longer, but they should be tested first after the three-year period. The resin may crystallize or the hardener may darken but this does not affect its performance. Crystallized resins should be reheated in a water bath that is at least 125°F until the resin clears up prior to use on the project.

     

  • Will epoxy be damaged if stored in freezing or cold temperatures?

    Crystallization occurs when the product is exposed to low temperatures for prolonged periods of time; the presence of any impurities will then initiate the crystallization process. 
    System Three products are formulated to resist Crystallization, but it can still occur. 
    Heat will bring the resin back to a usable state, and the best way to heat the resin is to place the container in a water bath with water heated to 125°F. 

  • Avoiding Bubbles In Epoxy Applications

    Bubble formation in epoxy coatings is more times than not the result of air expanding within a porous substrate and releasing into the freshly applied epoxy.  To avoid this issue consider the following:

    1. Avoid applying epoxy on a surface that is being heated either by the sun or a conventional heater.  When possible, wait till the substrate has stabilized in temperature or is in the process of cooling before applying epoxy. 
    2. The first coat of epoxy applied on raw wood should be very thin.  Use a 1/8" foam roller and apply the epoxy at 1/2 fluid oz. per sq. ft.  Some ultra-porous substrates may require a second seal coat.  If a seal coat is applied too thick, persistent bubbles which are difficult to remove will result. 

    3. Bubbles can also be present over a fully sealed substrate.  These bubbles are the result of entrained air from mixing or the product of brushing or rolling.  Most of the time these bubbles will pop naturally.  Stubborn bubbles can be popped by lightly dragging a brush over the surface of the epoxy.  A propane torch can be used judiciously by holding the flame 6-8" from the surface while moving quickly back and forth.  Do not overwork the bubbles with the torch as scorching of the epoxy can occur.  
  • How much epoxy do I need for my project?

    ESTIMATING USAGE

    The tables below are a guide for estimating the amount of material recommended, depending on the end use.

     

    Coating Plywood/Hardwood

    Mixed resin/hardener coverage in square feet per gallon

     

     

     Seal Coat

     

     Build Coats

    *Softwood

     

    200-250

     

    400/4 mils

    Hardwood

     

    250-300

     

    400/4 mils

    Vertical Surface

     

    200-250

     

    500/3 mils

    *Some soft wood materials will require 2 seal coats due to higher absorption.

     

    Fiberglassing

    Mixed resin/hardener coverage in square feet per gallon

     

     

    Wet-Out

     

     Fill Coats

    4 oz. cloth

     

    150

     

    300

    6 oz. cloth

     

    130

     

    250

    10 oz. cloth

     

    100

     

    170

    24 oz. Biaxial Tape

     

    32

     

    40

     

    Adhesive Glue Lines

     

     

    Thickness

    Softwood

    Sq./Ft./Gal.

    Hardwood

    Sq./Ft./Gal.

    Clamped Joints

    3-4 mils

    400

    500

    Vacuum Bagging

    8 mils

    200

    200

    Stapled Veneer

    20 mils

    80

    80

     

     

    Fillets

     

    Fillet Size

    1/4” X 1/4”

    1/2” X 1/2"

    3/4” X 3/4”

    1” x 1”

    Ounces Per Linear Foot

    4

    8

    11

    14

     

     

    Fairing

     

    Fairing Thickness

    1/16”

    1/8”

    1/4 “

    3/8”

    Ounces Per Square Foot

    5

    10

    20

    30

     

     

     

    U-TAH Cartridge*

     

    Bead Size

    1/8” x 1/8”

    1/4” x 1/4"

    3/8” x 3/8”

    T-88

    44’

    22’

    11’

    GelMagic

    34’

    17’

    9’

    Quick Cure 5 & 15

    44’

    22’

    11’

    *The units reflected are linear feet per cartridge.

     

    System Three® Resins, Inc.  P.O. Box 399, Auburn, WA 98071

     

    The information contained herein is based on the data available to us and is believed to be correct. However, System Three Resins, Inc. makes no warranty, expressed or implied, regarding the accuracy of these data or the results to be obtained from the use thereof. System Three assumes no responsibility for injury from the use of the product described herein.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • Do you still supply "The Epoxy Book?"

    Yes.  The original System Three® "how to" manual is alive and well on the website.  It is available in downloadable sections, or all at once here.

     Epoxy_Book_Cover.jpg

  • How to remove cured epoxy.

    Cured epoxy can be successfully removed from most substrates by using a quality paint stripper.  However, care should be exercised as paint stripper can damage other surfaces.  Carefully follow the manufactures instructions and recommendations.

See all 34 articles

Measuring & Mixing

  • How do I measure by volume vs by weight?

    Liquid products can easily be measured by volume; paste and solid products must be measured by weight. To measure by volume, the use of disposable cups with graduation marks on the side is adequate. Pour the Part A resin and the Part B hardener on top of each other, in the same container. For measurement by weight, a gram scale (for small batches), or a postal scale(for larger batches) is necessary.

  • How to use a 50mL cartridge.

    The 50mL cartridges are available with our 1:1 adhesives such as the T-88 and QuickCure 5 & 15 only.

  • Waxed paper cups.

    System Three's wax-lined paper cups are designed for measuring and mixing and not for storage. Most people will mix a volume as needed and apply it to the substrate well before it gets hot. Therefore, the wax coating is negligible. If a longer working time is needed, the contents should be poured into a wide containment such as a plastic paint tray. This will lengthen the pot life of the mixed epoxy and prevent it from getting too hot.  

  • Why did my epoxy heat up soon after I mixed it?

    Many of our clear epoxy adhesives, coatings, and laminating resins will heat up, or exotherm, if left in the mixing container too long because of the chemical reaction.

  • Epoxy got hot. What happened?

    Most of our liquid epoxy products need to be poured out soon after the two parts are mixed together to prevent premature curing, called "exotherm."