General

  • How to decipher the batch number or code.

    The batch number is a 6-digit code that is associated with the product's manufacture date and is typically located on the bottom of the container. 

    Batch code: X(YEAR) XX(MONTH) XX(DAY) X (INTERNAL CODE)

    Example: A product with the batch code #806141 was manufactured on June 14th, 2018.

  • How to fix orange peel in an epoxy coating.

    To help fix the appearance of orange peeling, please allow the existing epoxy to cure for about 48 hours or until hard enough for sanding. Block sand flat using 120-150 grit, vacuum sanding dust and wipe clean with denatured alcohol. You may then re-coat.

  • Are System Three products suitable for the fabrication or repair of a fuel or gas tank?

    Our coating resins and adhesives are resistant to diesel and aircraft fuel, but have limited resistance to gasoline. 

  • Get rid of bubbles in an epoxy coating.

    Two methods can be used to rid of bubbles in an epoxy coating:

    1. Roll and Tip Method: Bubbles that persist in the coating can be broken with a disposable bristle brush by lightly dragging it across the surface after rolling the product out. 

    2. Propane Torch: Quickly and lightly fan 6-8 inches above the uncured surface with a propane torch to accomplish bubble popping with greater speed. Avoid overheating an area as this could cause the epoxy film to pull away from the surface creating craters.

    NOTE: When coating a porous surface like concrete or wood, overheating to pop bubbles with a torch can cause the expansion of any air in the pores of the substrate and can make the bubble situation worse.

  • Which product, the Marine Spar Varnish or WR-LPU, offers better long lasting UV protection?

    WR-LPU offers better UV protection for epoxy resins and the surface underneath better than Marine Spar Varnish.  How much better depends on the length and severity of the exposure.  WR-LPU is a little more expensive, but being waterborne, is available anywhere in North America.  Spar Varnish contains VOC content, and its use is restricted in some areas, but if available, offers more ease-of-application and a cost savings over WR-LPU.

  • Why didn't the epoxy cure?

    There are two common reasons why the epoxy didn't cure:  incorrect measuring and incomplete mixing.  Measuring and mixing is really easy with most System Three® epoxy systems because they mix at a 2:1 or 1:1 volume ratio, but this doesn’t mean you don’t have to pay attention to what you’re doing. First , read the label or Technical Data Sheet to see what the correct ratio is for the product you are using. Customers will call our Technical Support line suggesting that something is wrong with the epoxy because it didn’t cure properly. We know of no situation where properly-mixed resin/hardener has gone bad or has been contaminated and wouldn’t cure. In the majority of cases, it turns out that the batch was either incorrectly measured or insufficiently mixed. Epoxy chemistry just will not allow it to work any other way.

    If you’re working on a project that requires you mix many small resin batches, develop a measuring technique that is sufficiently accurate and stay with it. Doing it the same way each time will minimize the chance for error. 

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Measuring & Mixing

  • Waxed paper cups.

    System Three's wax-lined paper cups are designed for measuring and mixing and not for storage. Most people will mix a volume as needed and apply it to the substrate well before it gets hot. Therefore, the wax coating is negligible. If a longer working time is needed, the contents should be poured into a wide containment such as a plastic paint tray. This will lengthen the pot life of the mixed epoxy and prevent it from getting too hot.  

  • How do I measure by volume vs by weight?

    Liquid products can easily be measured by volume; paste and solid products must be measured by weight. To measure by volume, the use of disposable cups with graduation marks on the side is adequate. Pour the Part A resin and the Part B hardener on top of each other, in the same container. For measurement by weight, a gram scale (for small batches), or a postal scale(for larger batches) is necessary.

  • Why did my epoxy heat up soon after I mixed it?

    Many of our clear epoxy adhesives, coatings, and laminating resins will heat up, or exotherm, if left in the mixing container too long because of the chemical reaction.

  • Epoxy got hot. What happened?

    Most of our liquid epoxy products need to be poured out soon after the two parts are mixed together to prevent premature curing, called "exotherm."

     

     

Adhesive Bonding with Epoxy

  • What materials will your adhesives bond together?

    System Three® epoxy resin adhesives will bond (glue) all woods, most metals, concrete, masonry, glass.  They will also bond some plastics like nylon and Mylar. Following a flame-treatment surface preparation, they will bond to many other plastics including polyethylene, polypropylene, polyvinyl chloride, acrylic and polycarbonate plastics. Generally, epoxy adhesives are the best choice for bonding dissimilar materials together. If epoxy bonds to Material A and to Material B it will bond the two materials to each other. The best thing to do is to try it and see for yourself.

  • What materials will adhere to epoxy surfaces?

    System Three® coating/laminating resins present easy-to-bond to surfaces.  When these surfaces are cured and prepared properly, nearly any film-forming coating or adhesive will bond well to them.  Follow the surface preparation directions on the product you intend to use over the top of the System Three epoxy product.