General

  • The Part A resin has hardened and turned white. Can I still use it?

    Yes. The white solid or haziness is a mass of resin crystals. Crystallized resin will not cure properly. To bring the resin back to a usable state, heat the bottle up in a water bath above 125 degrees F until the resin clears up. It will then be ready for use.

  • Where can I find your Safety Data Sheets (SDS)?

    Up-to-date SDS documents are available on the individual product pages or in the RESOURCES section at SystemThree.com

  • The Part B hardener has gotten darker over time. Can I still use it?

    Probably. Hardeners yellow and darken over time due to contact with air and sunlight. This does not affect their performance. To satisfy yourself do a small test and make sure it cures properly.

  • What is the shelf life of your epoxy resin products?

    We will guarantee the performance of our epoxy products for three years from the date of manufacture, printed on the bottom of the containers, provided they are stored properly. They will probably last much longer, but they should be tested first after the three-year period. The resin may crystallize or the hardener may darken but this does not affect its performance. Crystallized resins should be reheated in a water bath that is 125 F until the resin clears up prior to use in your application.

     

  • Can System Three epoxies be used in direct contact with food?

    Our products are marine or industrial, and not intended for use in applications involving food contact. To claim that a product is food-safe, it must be tested by an independent lab, which we do not do. On the other hand, when some of our two-part epoxy products are properly measured and mixed, then properly cured, they are theoretically inert and would be no more of a problem than many other plastics. But since the accuracy of those processes is beyond our control, we can’t make those claims.

  • Will epoxy resin adhesives bond any material together?

    Epoxy resin adhesives will bond all woods, aluminum and glass well. It does not bond to Teflon, polyethylene, polypropylene, nylon, or Mylar. It bonds poorly to polyvinyl chloride, acrylic and polycarbonate plastics. The only way to tell if an epoxy will bond to a material is to try it. Generally, epoxy adhesives are the best choice for bonding dissimilar materials together. If epoxy bonds to Material A and to Material B it will bond the two materials to each other. The best thing to do is to try it and see for yourself.

Measuring & Mixing

  • Epoxy got hot. What happened?

    Most of our liquid epoxy products need to be poured out soon after the two parts are mixed together to prevent premature curing, called "exotherm."